Aurora Borealis in Britain on Mother’s Day

Aurora Borealis in Britain on Mother’s Day

The Latin is Aurora Borealis which means “morning light coming from the north”
The Latin word “borealis” was used, not the name of a Greek god.

The phenomenon itself has been known for a long time in Europe; for example, the ancient Greeks called it “blazing skies” or “flaming sky dragons” (Hesiod, Theogony).

The term “aurora borealis” was arguably first used by a French scientist Petrus Gassendus aka Pierre Gassendi in 1621, in his treatise “Physics.” For further discussion, see Siscoe, George. 1986. An historical footnote on the origin of ‘Aurora Borealis.’ In History of geophysics, volume 2

http://linguistics.stackexchange.com/questions/1079/why-is-aurora-borealis-from-greek-but-aurora-australis-from-latin

In ancient Roman mythology, Aurora is the goddess of the dawn, renewing herself every morning to fly across the sky, announcing the arrival of the sun.
The name Aurora, however, simply comes from the Latin word for the dawn. The goddess was not associated with polar light phenomena, in Roman myth.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora

Therefore the following explanation is untrue:

In 1619, the astronomer Galileo Galilei coined the term “Aurora Borealis” for a phenomenon observed mostly at very high latitudes: shimmering bands of color arcing across the night sky. Aurora was the name for the goddess of the dawn according to the Romans (known as Eos and usually described as “rosy-fingered” by the Greeks), while Boreas was the god of the north wind.

Aurora

God Boreas (North Wind) & Goddess Aurora (Dawn)

Although the name reflects Galileo’s Italian world view, the lights are mentioned in various cultures. It’s also possible that some “impressionistic” cave drawings actually depict auroras in the sky. The indigenous peoples of America and Canada also have traditions related to the auroras, and in Europe, the Norse god of winter, Ullr produced the Aurora Borealis, according to the regional mythology, to illuminate the longest nights of the year. The earliest recorded detail is from China, in 2600 B.C.

http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/expressions/g/AuroraBorealis.htm

Cro-Magnon cave-paintings macaronis may be earliest depiction of aurora 30,000 B.C.

Cro-Magnon cave-paintings macaronis may be earliest depiction of aurora 30,000 B.C.

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6th March 2016 Mother’s Day British Isles

Scotland

6th March 2016 aurora borealis The Cowshed Uig Isle of Skye

The Cowshed Uig Isle of Skye – photographer unknown

6th March 2016 aurora borealis Loch Lomand by Vanessa Graham

Loch Lomand by Vanessa Graham

6th March 2016 aurora borealis Stonehaven Aberdeenshire by Brian Doyle

Stonehaven Aberdeenshire by Brian Doyle

Eire

6th March 2016 aurora borealis Ballynamona Beach County Cork Eire by Ronan McLaughlin

Ballynamona Beach County Cork Eire by Ronan McLaughlin

Northern England

6th March 2016 aurora borealis Patterdale, Cumbria by Thomas Matthews

Patterdale, Cumbria by Thomas Matthews

6th March 2016 aurora borealis Dunstanburgh Castle Alnwick Northumberland by Phil Pounder

Dunstanburgh Castle Alnwick Northumberland by Phil Pounder

6th March 2016 aurora borealis Seaburn, Sunderland

Seaburn, Sunderland by Dean Matthews

6th March 2016 aurora borealis Saltburn Pier North Yorkshire by Damian Money

Saltburn Pier North Yorkshire by Damian Money

Southern England

6th March 2016 aurora borealis Oxfordshire by Mary Spicer

Oxfordshire by Mary Spicer

In order to see the spectacular light show, wait until the sky is dark and clear of clouds. Scientists advise viewers to aim for ‘magnetic midnight’ – between 8pm and 12am in the British Isles.

The Northern Lights tend to be most active around the equinoxes in spring between March and April and autumn between September and October, according to the Met Office.

Remote areas, which do not have light pollution and face the northern horizon, tend to be the best places to see the Aurora Borealis.

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Rather misnamed as it is not a dawn spectacle.

Evening Prayer to Dea Matrona

Divine Flower of the Dusk, Lamp of Evening Star,
May your Torches light the path, through the darkening hour
May your Golden Keys unlock Mysteries of Dark Light.
Keep us Saviour, free from harm, until Dawn shines bright.

Wisdom’s Day, 12 Maia (27 May) 2015 CE
By: Matrona Georgia Rosenhearth Bonnie-Fire